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Too complicated

In summary, the healthcare system has become cumbersome to the point of being dysfunctional. Our proposed new system, which I originally endorsed, will clearly not solve things. As it is now it is also overly complicated with too many moving parts. There is clearly no perfect solution, but we can do better. More next time. Read More 
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The pot grows bigger

When Medicare and Medicaid arrived, the pot became much larger, and possibilities to increase income improved. Read my three books THE CORRIDOR, THE PAIN DOC, AND THE LABYRINTH for great examples. At the same time, the insurers and now the government began to fight back with deductibles, co-pays, and piles of bureaucracy and paper work. When I first entered practice the three-man group had all the billing done by one part time employee armed with a pencil and a pad of bills. Now such a practice might have four or more full time people with computers to do the same work. This type of inefficiency has invaded every corner of medicine. Read More 
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Reimbursement drops

It did not take long for employers and insurers to take notice rising fees, after all, they were the payers. Insurance companies began to ask doctors and hospitals to “participate in their plan.” In return they would send patients their way and, at first, even pay the participating provider more. Once the “hook” was set, the fees began to drop, and if unhappy providers “dropped out” they would not be paid at all. Read More 
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Hospitalization Insurance

In the mid-20th century, technology blossomed along with cost. With the post WWII industry came the idea of “hospitalization insurance” to cover the increasing cost of hospital care. Organized labor soon saw this as a worthwhile benefit and soon many hourly workers had this wonderful security. In the early days, employers were also happy as they could satisfy the workers with relatively little cost.
Now it’s your turn. Let me know how your rate your current “healthcare insurance”. Read More 
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