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Montmagny

Improved Citadel
Book Thirteen: Montmagny: As Canada mourned the loss of the most loved Champlain, France sent a replacement. Charles Huault de Montmagny lacked Champlain’s devotion to Canada but brought much needed administrative skills the new land lacked. He began with a tour of the land from Tadoussac to Montréal with Captain Noël Langlois and his Indian guide and companion, Jacques-Henri. He rebuilt defenses including transforming the wooden fort overlooking the city to a stone fortress, reorganized the military, and began modernizing Québec. At the same time, he negotiated with the natives and saw the arrival of the Ursuline and Augustinian Nuns. Read More 
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The End of Champlain

Champlain as he stands today in Quebec
Book Thirteen: The death of Champlain: The father of Canada, Samuel Champlain’s life was filled with fits and starts, triumphs and defeat, advancement and decline. In truth, Canada at the time of his demise was not markedly different from its state when he founded Québec in 1608. The primary difference was that with the arrival of the Percheron express with a few real families, Champlain left the small seeds of success at the time of his death on Christmas day 1635.
From this point you can follow the growth of French Canada through the end of this book, to The Beaver Wars, due out in a month or so, followed by The Allard Series: Book One: The New World, Book Two: The Hunter, and Book Three: Peace and War, all available in Print or on Kindle through Amazon.Com. Read More 
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The Beaver Wars

The Beaver Wars
The Beaver Wars: The English colonies shared the interest in furs early in their colonial life. The French traded with the northern tribes, Algonquin, Huron, and others, while the English trade was generally with the more southern tribes like the Iroquois. As the beaver became scarce, the trappers moved inland, but soon the Iroquois lands were out of beaver, causing the tribes to north, into the traditional lands of the northern tribe. The Algonquin/Huron tribes were traditionally less friendly with the Iroquois, and as the beaver trade became competitive, this competitiveness turned to hostilities, and tribal battles increased in frequency as well as violence beginning what has been called “The Beaver Wars” and it is in this setting the second book of the series is set. Read More 
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Benoît and Bernier

Benoît and Bernier
Book Thirteen: Benoît and Bernier. These two lovable and philosophic voyageurs are sadly fictitious but they have provided a wonderful foil for discussing the early years of Québec from a new perspective. You will be pleased that they will continue on in an even more important position in book Fourteen. Read More 
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