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Following the Revolution

Following the revolution, Détroit remains in British hands despite treaties and agreements to the contrary. Jacques marries Jennie Laforest, the sister of his good friend Jean-Baptiste Laforest. Starting a farm and a family on the Milk River Settlement in Grosse Pointe, Jacques becomes a respected citizen and increases his land holdings on the farm that will hold the family through Book Eight: The Chief. Read More 
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American Revolution

The American Revolution: This was another source of ambivalence for the French citizens. Many did have American sympathies and took part in the ill-fated Battle of Québec, as well as other successful battles such as Saratoga. As shown in The Allards Book Three: Peace and War, the Americans learned a great deal from both the French and Indian styles in battle, and men such as Thomas Sumter, Andrew Pickens and Francis Marion used it to their great advantage. Read More 
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American Revolution

Samuel Price, an old friend of Jacques’s late father, Pierre, arrives in Détroit. A British Colonist active in the smoldering descent of the 13 colonies, he secretly recruits French citizens of Détroit to aid in the coming Revolution. During the American Revolution, Jacques, Henri-Pierre, and many others hold secret meetings and give aid to the Americans. They travel to Massachusetts to instruct the American militia in French and Indian warfare. Later they are part of a failed attempt to take Québec but also of a successful battle at Saratoga. Read More 
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Lake St. Clair and St. Clair Flats

Lake Saint Clair and the Saint Clair Flats: An area that has always held a special meaning for me. There is hardly a memory of my youth that does not contain it. It was equally special to my Allard ancestors. As a youngster, trips to Harsens Island were always a high point of the summer. Reachable only by ferry, it retained a tranquility which I remember to this day. We would always stop at Brown’s landing, home and business of my mother’s first cousin, Earl Brown. We visited his establishment often, and before his death a few years ago he was very helpful in my research of the Allards. Read More 
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