instagram pinterest linkedin facebook twitter goodreads

Blog

Picnics

Sunday Picnics: Always a part of French life in the new world, these affairs continued to the time of my youth. My mother and grandmother told wonderful stories about them. They were ongoing forums for gossip, socializing, news, discussions, eating, drinking, and the occasional “friendly fights” so common to the French culture in the new world. Read More 
Be the first to comment

Americans take control of Detroit

The American Government: This presented another ambivalence for the now French-Americans which will play into book five. As Jacques Allard told Hamtramck, most French stayed where they were: either in Détroit or Sandwich (now Windsor) with little regard to the government. Again they remained aloof. Read More 
Be the first to comment

Following the Revolution

Following the revolution, Détroit remains in British hands despite treaties and agreements to the contrary. Jacques marries Jennie Laforest, the sister of his good friend Jean-Baptiste Laforest. Starting a farm and a family on the Milk River Settlement in Grosse Pointe, Jacques becomes a respected citizen and increases his land holdings on the farm that will hold the family through Book Eight: The Chief. Read More 
Be the first to comment

American Revolution

The American Revolution: This was another source of ambivalence for the French citizens. Many did have American sympathies and took part in the ill-fated Battle of Québec, as well as other successful battles such as Saratoga. As shown in The Allards Book Three: Peace and War, the Americans learned a great deal from both the French and Indian styles in battle, and men such as Thomas Sumter, Andrew Pickens and Francis Marion used it to their great advantage. Read More 
Be the first to comment

American Revolution

Samuel Price, an old friend of Jacques’s late father, Pierre, arrives in Détroit. A British Colonist active in the smoldering descent of the 13 colonies, he secretly recruits French citizens of Détroit to aid in the coming Revolution. During the American Revolution, Jacques, Henri-Pierre, and many others hold secret meetings and give aid to the Americans. They travel to Massachusetts to instruct the American militia in French and Indian warfare. Later they are part of a failed attempt to take Québec but also of a successful battle at Saratoga. Read More 
Be the first to comment

Lake St. Clair and St. Clair Flats

Lake Saint Clair and the Saint Clair Flats: An area that has always held a special meaning for me. There is hardly a memory of my youth that does not contain it. It was equally special to my Allard ancestors. As a youngster, trips to Harsens Island were always a high point of the summer. Reachable only by ferry, it retained a tranquility which I remember to this day. We would always stop at Brown’s landing, home and business of my mother’s first cousin, Earl Brown. We visited his establishment often, and before his death a few years ago he was very helpful in my research of the Allards. Read More 
Be the first to comment

Pontiac's War

After the fall of French Canada to the British in 1760, the native and French people of Détroit were uncertain of their future. As the British presence became more prominent, the Indians began to lose the standing they once had with the French. Pontiac was a shrewd leader and at one point during the conflict controlled most of the Great Lakes Region. There were Frenchmen in Détroit with loyalties to each side. Most had sympathies with the Indians but realized the ultimate outcome. As a result most remained aloof. I believe my description of events is fairly accurate. Read More 
Be the first to comment

St. Clair Flats

More Book Four: The Voyageur
On return Jacques remains in Détroit with the family of Henri-Pierre. During the next few years the boys travel to the frontier with Charbonneau and later form their own group to trap and trade northern Lake Saint Clair and the Saint Clair Flats. In 1773 Détroit is adjusting to British rule when Pontiac’s rebellion breaks all tranquility for three years. Read More 
Be the first to comment

Voyageurs Route West


Following the old voyageur river trail to the Ohio our heroes arrive at St. Louis, the last real outpost. From there they take the Missouri River to the Great Falls in what is now Montana. During this time the boys learn trapping, trading and the ways of the Native Americans of the West with no small amount of adventure, danger, and some teenage romance. Read More 
Be the first to comment

Landing in Detroit

Eventually the two canoes arrive at the Straits of Détroit. Little more than a fort and trading post at this time, it will remain the home of the Allards for the remainder of the Allard Series. Here they take on more men including Henri-Pierre de Baptiste, the grandson of old Joseph. He and Jacques Allard are destined to become life-long companions as they depart from Antoine Cadillac’s city in the wilderness for the true frontier and lands seen by few if any white men. Read More 
Be the first to comment