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Americans take control of Detroit

The American Government: This presented another ambivalence for the now French-Americans which will play into book five. As Jacques Allard told Hamtramck, most French stayed where they were: either in Détroit or Sandwich (now Windsor) with little regard to the government. Again they remained aloof. Read More 
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Detroit after revolution

1781-1796: Most Detroiters are unaware of this interesting period of fifteen long years when Détroit was theoretically part of the United States but remained under British rule. The British believed as long as they controlled the vital straits, the Americans could not sustain the Indian war, and the new country would eventually fall back to British hands. Had it not been for the persistence of Washington and Anthony Wayne along with their French-Canadian allies this could have been the case. Read More 
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Following the Revolution

Following the revolution, Détroit remains in British hands despite treaties and agreements to the contrary. Jacques marries Jennie Laforest, the sister of his good friend Jean-Baptiste Laforest. Starting a farm and a family on the Milk River Settlement in Grosse Pointe, Jacques becomes a respected citizen and increases his land holdings on the farm that will hold the family through Book Eight: The Chief. Read More 
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American Revolution

The American Revolution: This was another source of ambivalence for the French citizens. Many did have American sympathies and took part in the ill-fated Battle of Québec, as well as other successful battles such as Saratoga. As shown in The Allards Book Three: Peace and War, the Americans learned a great deal from both the French and Indian styles in battle, and men such as Thomas Sumter, Andrew Pickens and Francis Marion used it to their great advantage. Read More 
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American Revolution

Samuel Price, an old friend of Jacques’s late father, Pierre, arrives in Détroit. A British Colonist active in the smoldering descent of the 13 colonies, he secretly recruits French citizens of Détroit to aid in the coming Revolution. During the American Revolution, Jacques, Henri-Pierre, and many others hold secret meetings and give aid to the Americans. They travel to Massachusetts to instruct the American militia in French and Indian warfare. Later they are part of a failed attempt to take Québec but also of a successful battle at Saratoga. Read More 
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